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American Resources Policy Network
Promoting the development of American mineral resources.
  • ARPN Expert: Partisan Politics Aside, New Congress Holds Opportunity to Strengthen Defense Industrial Base

    In a new piece for Defense News, Jeff Green, president of Washington, D.C.-based government relations firm J.A. Green & Company, and member of the ARPN panel of experts, calls on lawmakers on Capitol Hill to work towards overcoming partisan divides and “find common ground to support the defense-industrial base.”

    One of the first analysts to comment on last year’s Defense Industrial Base Review, calling it a significant step forward for the U.S. military, Green says that thanks to the study’s detailed recommendations, “lawmakers have a unique opportunity to address industrial-base gaps with efficiency and precision. This should allow Congress to find ways forward to create policies and funding opportunities for American defense suppliers and reduce barriers to U.S. industrial-base competitiveness.”

    Green further argues that the upcoming reauthorization of the Defense Production Act of 1950, which “remains the premier source of authority for stewardship of the defense-industrial base” provides an opportunity for cooperation.

    With our over-reliance on foreign mineral resources growing “by the hour,” as Green puts it, mine permitting reform — which also made our list of “2019 New Year’s Resolutions for Mineral Resource Policy Reform” — “should also be at the top of Congress’ list.”

    Green believes that in spite of the partisan divide in Washington, “industrial-base policy offers one of the most fertile areas for bipartisan cooperation” – but lawmakers must commit to “not intentionally create legislative gridlock in order to advance partisan political agendas that stand little chance of becoming law.”

    We all know that this is a big ask in Washington. However, as Green rightly states, while “neither side will get everything they want, legislators have many opportunities to advance priorities that matter to everyone, including support for U.S. manufacturing and the American worker. Given that the defense-industrial base programs count for less than 0.1 percent of the Defense Department budget, it would be wise for Congress to ensure stable and consistent funding for the programs in this critical policy area.”

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  • Washington’s Mining and Resource Policy Agenda – What’s in Store for 2019?

    As we get back into the swing of things, a new piece for E&E News previews the anticipated 2019 mining and mineral resource policy agenda in Washington, DC. Here are some of the highlights:

    • With a shift of power in the House of Representatives, hard rock leasing and reclamation issues are expected to come up in May, which marks the 147th anniversary of the 1872 General Mining Act, with mining critics pushing for restrictions on mining on public lands and royalties imposed on mining companies.
    • Rep. Mark Amodei’s (R-Nev.) bill to streamline the mining permitting process, provisions of which were initially included in the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, but got stripped out in conference, is also likely to make a comeback this year.
    • On the Senate side, E&E expects Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) to work to further her efforts on permitting reform and reducing the United States’ reliance on critical minerals, which she has previously incorporated into her broader energy reform package.
    • Meanwhile, with DoI’s Critical Minerals List released, stakeholders and policy makers alike are still awaiting the Department of Commerce’s report on how how to deal with DoI’s findings and how to reduce American mineral resource dependencies, as required by Executive Order 13817, issued in December of 2017.
    • As E&E reports, the Forest Service has already undertaken its own efforts to reduce mine permitting delays by issuing a “notice of proposed rule-making to update its review process for mines, known as Part 228” with a draft rule to update the locatable minerals regulations expected later this year.

    However, that is not all. To see what other issues can be expected to dominate the mining and resource policy agenda this year, refer to the full piece here.

    It’s going to be a busy year, and as we’ve outlined in our recent “2019 New Year’s Resolutions for Mineral Resource Policy Reform” post, other broader policy areas, such as trade, are becoming increasingly intertwined with resource policy, broadening the scope and implications of policy decisions. With the United States’ competitiveness and national security at stake, rest assured that ARPN will keep tabs on all these issues in the months to come, so if you haven’t bookmarked our site or aren’t following us via social media, now is the time.

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  • Copper and the 2018 Critical Minerals List – Considerations for Resource Policy Reform

    While we’re still waiting for policy makers and other stakeholders to take further action, in 2018 an important step was taken to set the stage for mineral resource policy reform with the release of the Department of Interior’s List of 35 Minerals Deemed Critical to U.S. National Security and the Economy. Throughout the drafting stage [...]
  • 2019 New Year’s Resolutions for Mineral Resource Policy Reform

    Out with the old, in with the new, they say. It‘s new year‘s resolutions time.  With the end of 2017 having set the stage for potentially meaningful reform in mineral resource policy, we outlined a set of suggested resolutions for stakeholders for 2018 in January of last year.  And while several important steps  were taken [...]
  • 2018 – A Year of Incremental Progress?

    In case you hadn’t noticed amidst holiday preparations, travel arrangements and the usual chaos of everyday life – 2019 is just around the corner, and with that, the time to reflect on the past twelve months has arrived. So here is ARPN’s recap of 2018: Where we began. Unlike previous years, we started 2018 with [...]
  • U.S. To Partner With Australia on Critical Minerals R&D

    During an industry event in Melbourne, Australian Resources Minister Matt Canavan announced that Australia and the United States are going to sign a preliminary agreement to foster mineral research and development cooperation between the two countries. The announcement comes on the heels of the release of U.S. Department of Interior’s list of 35 metals and [...]
  • The “Indispensable Twins” of Critical Minerals – Niobium and Tantalum

    In the latest installment of his “Critical Minerals Alaska” series for North of 60 Mining News, Shane Lasley zeroes in on what USGS has dubbed the “indispensable twins” – Niobium and Tantalum. Both share “nearly indistinguishable physical and chemical properties” and are “critical to the defense, energy and high-tech sectors.”  Meanwhile, neither Niobium nor Tantalum are mined in the United States, so their inclusion [...]
  • Hot Off the Press: “Groundbreaking” Reading Material – ARPN Expert Co-Authors Book Sounding Alarm on Over-Reliance on Foreign Minerals

    Scratch your holiday wish list – there’s a new book you’ll have to add. In the just-released “Groundbreaking! America’s New Quest for Mineral Independence” member of the ARPN expert panel Ned Mamula, an adjunct scholar in geosciences at the Center for the Study of Science, Cato Institute, and “Rare Mettle”author Ann Bridges sound the alarm on the United States’ [...]
  • “Action Can’t Come Soon Enough” –  A Call for Comprehensive Resource Policy From a National Security Perspective

    As America gets back into the swing of things after suffering from a collective “post-Thanksgiving rut,” James Clad, former deputy assistant Secretary of Defense and current Senior Fellow at the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington, DC, provides a good  recap of why we need to get our resource policy house in order from a national security [...]
  • Post-Thanksgiving Rut? Back to Basics on Resource Policy Issues

    If you’re still struggling to get your bearings after the long Thanksgiving weekend, you’re not alone. A New York Times piece from this Monday provides a good snapshot of what we are going through –  and offers “4 Ways to Stay Motivated When You’re in a Rut:”  Writes the NYT: “It’s the Monday after Thanksgiving, and we’re all [...]

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