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American Resources Policy Network
Promoting the development of American mineral resources.
  • ICYMI – Video and Supporting Documents for AGI Webinar on “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials”

    Last month, the American Geosciences Institute ran a webinar entitled “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials.” 

    Speakers for the event, which discussed “efforts to gather information and develop tools that can be used to ensure a secure national and global supply of mineral resources, and identify and quantifying vulnerabilities in this supply, among others,” included:

    • Nedal Nassar, Chief of the Materials Flow Analysis Section at the USGS’s National Minerals Information Center, and
    • Vitor Correia, President of the European Federation of Geologists, and coordinator of the EU’s INTRAW project.

    If you missed it, the video and supporting documents are now online:

    Of particular interest for ARPN followers, Mr. Nassar, who authored a study on the issue of what he and his co-author Prof. Thomas Graedel called “byproduct metals” in 2015,  also highlighted the crucial nature and inter-relationship between Gateway Metals and their Co-Products.

    The video and slides serve as a great resource for stakeholders looking to engage in the national policy discourse over the formulation of a federal action plan to implement the recent executive order on critical minerals.

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  • 2018 – A Tipping Point For U.S. Resource Policy and Related Industries?

    The following is a guest post by ARPN expert panel member Chris Berry, Founder, House Mountain Partners. His expertise focuses on, but is not limited to, energy metals including Lithium, Cobalt, Graphite, Vanadium and Rare Earths.

    The Executive Order recently signed by President Trump to prioritize domestic natural resource development couldn’t have come at a better time. Though the idea of foreign dependence on critical raw materials such as rare earth elements, lithium, and cobalt is not a new one, globally synchronized economic growth and a new Administration in Washington have many thinking that “this time could be different” and a new approach and attitude towards domestic raw material extraction and processing has increased in importance.

    Technology has traditionally been a deflationary “force for good” specifically in the energy industry (think about how hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling in the oil and gas business has put OPEC on its heels and allowed a US-based oil and gas business to compete anew). The leadership that the US has shown in this industry is in no small part due to the research and development funding from the US Government in past decades. It is not a stretch to expect the same deflationary phenomenon to affect the mobility and energy storage industries underpinned by lithium ion batteries.

    Technologically-driven cost deflation can be seen in other industries such as the lithium ion battery business where the cost per kilowatt-hour (KWh) has fallen by roughly 10 to 14% per year since 2000. This has massive implications for both the energy industry (renewable energy deployment and grid integration) and automobile industry (electric vehicle adoption). Most experts expect cost parity between a full electric vehicle and a traditional internal combustion engine early in the next decade. What are we in the United States doing to get ready for this massive shift with respect to security of supply of raw materials?

    We are clearly at a tipping point for these industries, as their increasing need for critical minerals and metals intersects with an aggressive China, making security of supply of raw materials a small but highly significant Achilles Heel of supply chain management. The United States has numerous well known deposits of critical minerals, such as lithium and cobalt, many of which at today’s prices are economic to extract and process. So what are we waiting for? What we have lacked historically is the political will to find a balance between national security, commerce, and environmental concerns. President Trump’s Executive Order is a welcome, though controversial, first step in reckoning with this challenge that has profound consequences for US competitiveness and job creation going forward.

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  • Event Alert: Resources for Future Generations (#RFG2018) Conference

    We have barely taken down the Christmas decorations, but stores have their Valentine’s Day merchandise out, and we’re already halfway through January.  It may feel that way, but it’s really not to early to highlight an event coming up in June – Summer will be here before we know it. So mark your calendars, ladies [...]
  • Lithium – A Material “Coming of Age” is Case in Point for Mineral Resource Policy Reform

    As we have outlined, last month’s executive order on critical minerals could have far-reaching implications for our national security and economic wellbeing.  If you needed a case in point – look no further than Lithium. One of the hottest commodities of the day, Lithium, as ARPN expert panel member and managing director of Benchmark Mineral [...]
  • AGI to Host Webinar on Critical Minerals

    Mark your calendars – the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) will host a timely webinar on critical mineral issues later this month. The webinar entitled “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials” will be held on Friday, January 26, 2018, at 11:00am EST, and will “focus on U.S. and European Union (EU) efforts to gather information [...]
  • Member of ARPN Expert Panel Outlines Implications of Executive Order Targeting Critical Minerals

    Amidst the latest political drama, bomb cyclones and button size comparisons which are dominating the news cycle, you may have missed two great pieces of analysis by member of the ARPN panel of experts Jeff Green, president and founder of Washington, DC-based J.A. Green & Company – so we are highlighting them for you: In [...]
  • New Year’s Resolutions for Mineral Resource Policy Reform

    If you’re one of nearly half of all Americans, you will have already made a few New Year’s resolutions for 2018.   Among the most popular are personal betterment goals like “losing weight,” and “exercising more.”  While we’re all for making personal resolutions, at ARPN, we’re more concerned with the goals our policy makers are [...]
  • An Early Christmas Present? New Executive Order Calls for National Strategy to Increase Domestic Resource Development

    Only one day after USGS released its new report “Critical Minerals of the United States” – a study which underscores the United States’ over-reliance on foreign minerals – a new executive order directs Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to publish within 60 days a list of critical minerals to be followed by a report (after another [...]
  • 2017 – a Year of Mixed Signals: No Grand Strategy – But Some Signs We May Be Digging Out of Our Resource Dependency

    Amidst the chaos of Christmas shopping, holiday parties and travel arrangements, the end of the year is customarily the time to take stock of the last twelve months and assess where to go from here. Here is our recap of 2017: On the heels of a year that very much presented itself as a mixed [...]
  • ARPN’s McGroarty for Investor’s Business Daily: U.S. Mineral Resource Dependence a “Clear and Present Danger”

    Against the backdrop of growing threats to U.S. security – recent flash points involve Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea – a new Presidential Executive Order “On Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States,” zeroes in on defense readiness. The E.O. requires heads from various [...]

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