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American Resources Policy Network
Promoting the development of American mineral resources.
  • Panelists at U.S. House Hearing Stress Dangers of America’s Growing Resource Dependence

    During yesterday’s oversight hearing on the subject of “Examining Consequences of America’s Growing Dependence on Foreign Minerals,” before the House Natural Resources Committee, panelists raised some of the key issues we have consistently highlighted on our blog.

    Panelists included:

    • Mr. Ronnie Favors, Administrator, U.S. Defense Logistics Agency, Strategic Materials, U.S. Department of Defense
    • Dr. Murray Hitzman, Associate Director for Energy and Minerals, United States Geological Survey
    • Dr. Richard Silberglitt, Senior Physical Scientist, Rand Corporation
    • Ms. Katie Sweeney, Senior VP, Legal Affairs and General Counsel, National Mining Association
    • and Ms. Carlotta Tilousi, Council Member, Havasupai Tribe, Sepia, Arizona

    Full written testimony along with the video of the hearing are available on the committee website, but we wanted to highlight some of the points raised by one of the panelists, Dr. Silberglitt.

    Invoking the example of Tungsten, and the findings of a “RAND Corporation Study entitled Critical Materials: Present Danger to U.S. Manufacturing,” Dr. Silberglitt argued that

    “Dependence on imports is not necessarily a problem, as long as manufacturers have access to a global supply chain with fair market prices. Concerns arise when supply chains are dominated by countries that have weak governance or exercise control over their materials production sector. In such cases, U.S. manufacturers are vulnerable to export restrictions that limit their access. This can result in lower prices for manufacturers in the producing country, thereby hindering the international competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers and creating pressure to move manufacturing away from the United States and into the producing country.”

    The elephant in the room, according to Silberglitt, is – you probably guessed it – China, which as ARPN followers know is the biggest producer of global supplies for many metals and minerals we are dependent on — and is no stranger to export restrictions and other market distortion tools.

    According to Silberglitt,

    “Actions to increase resiliency can take two different forms: those that encourage diversified production and processing of critical materials and those that involve the development of alternative sources, such as secondary production or alternative inputs to manufacturing.”  

    Silberglitt said progress was being made in the former, but maintained that “the uncertainty created by a highly concentrated market is a barrier that must be overcome by actions at the local, national, regional and global levels to create a favorable and sustainable climate for the investments and time needed to bring diversified supplies into place.”

    Later in the hearing, the National Mining Association’s Katie Sweeney made the case for a merit-based review of federal land withdrawals, and stressed the issue of an onerous and duplicative permitting system hampering the United States’ ability to compete with jurisdictions like Canada and Australia – both of whom have equally high social and environmental standards when it comes to mining yet offer a significantly more streamlined permitting structure.

    Towards the end of the Q&A, Chairman Paul Gosar (R-Ariz.) entered into the record a study recently authored by the latest member of the ARPN expert panel – Dr. Ned Mamula’s “Strategic Minerals: The Embarrassment of Riches.” Most panelists agreed with the thrust of his report that the United States, which has vast mineral resources beneath our own soil, could and should do more to harness this potential.

    With a Senate hearing on the permitting processes at the Department of the Interior and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for energy and resource infrastructure projects also held yesterday, this week is a good week for mineral resource policy awareness on Capitol Hill. Here’s hoping policy makers mull over what they heard during the holidays and begin tackling the issues at hand in the new year.

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  • The Blessings Of A New World

    The following is a re-post from 2012:

    Today is American Thanksgiving – a celebration of the blessings afforded by our forefathers as they overcame adversity in a new land, laboring to obtain from the resources around them the necessities of life:  food, shelter, and warmth against winter’s cold.

    Since that first winter, the bounty of Thanksgiving has become a symbol of the abundant resources the New World provided.  From the raw materials that built our modern cities to the energy that has powered innovation in all its variety, these resources have enriched the lives of millions of people in America and around the world – making possible a way of life those who gathered around that first Thanksgiving table could never have imagined.

    Even today, of course, we know that too many are still doing without the basic necessities of life.  And yet the resources around us – those literally under our feet – remain plentiful.  All too often complacency and ideology lock us into inaction, blocking us from making use of the still-rich resources of this new world. Minerals, metals, fuel and timber that could create jobs, opportunities, and rewards for the American people are left untouched.

    Our forefathers understood privation and want.  They understood that nature sometimes rewards tireless work with a poor harvest.  But they also understood nature’s bounty.  What they would find beyond comprehending in our day is the willful failure to use resources we have at hand to ease hardship and make a better life for ourselves and for others.

    On this Thanksgiving, as we give thanks for our many blessings, may we also remember the lessons dating back to Plymouth Rock, that teach us to use our resources and resourcefulness to make an even newer and better world.

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  • “Time to Start Digging, America”

    In a recent piece for The Hill, William Murray, federal energy policy manager, and Ned Mamula, associate fellow for the Washington, D.C.-based R Street Institute, lament that while policy makers and stakeholders are increasingly focusing on energy security issues, leaders are failing to pay “the same attention to a national security risk at least as [...]
  • National Mining Association Urges Focus on Deterioration of Domestic Metal and Mineral Supply Chains

    In a detailed letter to Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Dr. John G. “Jerry” McGinn, Katie Sweeney, General Counsel of the National Mining Association, urges the Department of Defense to “acknowledge the importance of domestic metals and minerals to meet our defense needs” as the agency moves forward to implement Executive Order 13806, “Assessing [...]
  • European Commission Expands Critical Raw Materials List (U.S. Government, Are You Listening?)

    Earlier last month, the European Commission released an updated list of critical raw materials in the context of the European Union’s “Raw Materials Initiative” – a project put forward in 2008 to tackle challenges associated with raw material access.  The 2017 list is an update and expansion of the Commission’s 2014 list, identifying 27 raw [...]
  • New Report Zeroes in on Geopolitics of Renewable Energy 

    While the geopolitics of fossil fuels are well established, we at ARPN have long lamented the lack of awareness regarding the geopolitical implications of non-fuel mineral resource supply and demand. For that reason, we were very pleased to see a recently released study co-authored by Meghan L. O’Sullivan of Harvard University’s Kennedy School, Indra Overland [...]
  • Lithium – A Case In Point for Mining Policy Reform

    In a recent op-ed for the Reno Gazette Journal, professor emeritus of mining engineering at the University of Nevada, Reno, Jaak Daemen makes the case for comprehensive mining policy reform.   Citing the arrival of electric vehicles in which “battery technology is catching up with the hype,” he cautions that benefits benefits associated with the [...]
  • Why Cobalt Should be High on Your Radar

    In a recent article, the Financial Times zeroes in on one of the metals followers of ARPN will know is becoming increasingly indispensable to 21st Century clean energy technology: Cobalt.  Once an obscure metal you rarely heard about, this co-product of Nickel and Copper is increasingly afforded “critical mineral status” – primarily because of its [...]
  • AEMA Website Gets Fresh Look

    Our friends at the American Exploration and Mining Association (AEMA), headed up by Laura Skaer, have overhauled their website.  The “122-year old, 2,000 member, national association representing the minerals industry” and the “entire mining life cycle” shares news about its mission and advocacy efforts, and provides information about annual meetings as well as facts about [...]
  • Critical Materials Institute Meets “Stretch Goal” to Produce REE Magnet Domestically

    Meeting one of its “stretch goal[s] to demonstrate that rare-earth magnets could be produced from mine to manufacturer, here in the United States,” the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub, has announced that the has fabricated magnets made entirely of domestically sourced and refined REEs.  This success was achieved in [...]

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