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American Resources Policy Network
Promoting the development of American mineral resources.
  • American Resources Policy Network announces new Advisor on Advanced Materials

    Investment Intelligence Site Head Assumes Expanded Role Within ARPN

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Resources Policy Network has
 announced that Tracy Weslosky, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief for InvestorIntel, a global investment source for the resource, energy and technology sectors, and a member of the American Resources Policy Network panel of experts, will expand her role at the organization to serve as Advisor on Advanced Materials.

    Founder and CEO for ProEdge, an online publisher and media production company since 2001, which owns InvestorIntel, Weslosky is also the Managing Director of REE Stocks Company Ltd. (REE Stocks). Weslosky is an authority in the resource, oil and gas, energy, technology and entertainment industry sectors. Her more-than-twenty years of experience encompass owning her own boutique investment banking and investor relations firm, as well as numerous speaking engagements and publications in the rare earths and critical materials sector, including the renowned REE Handbook – the ultimate guide on rare earths.

    Says American Resources Principal Daniel McGroarty: “We’re thrilled to have Tracy expand her role at ARPN to advise us on advanced materials. With the global race for resources in full swing, the importance of this broad and fast-evolving field cannot be stressed enough, and Tracy undoubtedly has her finger on the pulse here.”

    He adds: “Tracy’s vast experience in the sector will be an asset to furthering the American Resources Policy Network’s mission to promote the exploration and development of the vast mineral resources we’re fortunate to have beneath our soil, and I look forward to collaborating with her.”

    To learn more about the American Resources team and our panelists,
 please visit our experts page.

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  • The OPEC of Rare Earths – China’s Resource Stranglehold and its National Security Implications

    In his latest column for Real Clear World, American Resources Principal Daniel McGroarty zeros in on China’s dominance of the Rare Earths market. Invoking lopsided production numbers – in spite of international efforts to develop Rare Earths outside of China, China’s supply monopoly still hovers at 95 percent – McGroarty likens China’s REE control to the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ (OPEC) powerful position in the oil market.

    As for the national security implications of the United States’ (unnecessary) reliance on foreign – and in many cases Chinese – mineral imports, McGroarty points out that according to the Congressional Research Service, REEs are “critical to five functional areas that collectively encompass every major war-fighting capability used to project power via ground, sea, air and space,” adding that they are just “one example of several dozen rare metals U.S. weapons designers use to create the “killer apps” of the modern military.”

    Says McGroarty:

    “In a different century and a different conflict, Lenin quipped that capitalists would sell his Bolsheviks ‘the rope to hang them with.’ Is it our strategy in the 21st Century to expect the world’s rising power to sell us the resources we may confront them with on the battlefields of tomorrow?”

    In the post-fiscal cliff world, this would be a good question for U.S. policymakers to ponder.

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  • Terminology matters – Clearing up the REE confusion

    As they are a hot commodity right now, talking about Rare Earths Elements is en vogue these days. As fascinating as they are, the terminology associated with this group of minerals composed of the fifteen lanthanoid elements plus Scandium and Yttrium remains confusing to many. To clarify things, American Resources expert and Technology Metals Research [...]
  • Indian-Japanese Rare Earths cooperation underscores geopolitical dimension of resource policy

    Dwarfed by Chinese production today, it may be hard to imagine that India was once the world’s leading Rare Earths producer. The country is now trying to gain foot hold in a market it dominated in the 1950s, and is hoping to benefit from a territorial dispute in the East China Sea. In the wake [...]
  • American Resources expert Jeffery Green: “Washington needs to realize that all roads lead to China”

    This week’s Critical Metals Report on the Gold Report’s website features an exclusive detailed interview with the latest expert to join the American Resources panel of experts: Jeffery Green, President and Founder of J.A. Green & Company, and Founder of the Strategic Materials Advisory Council. Discussing the U.S. policy landscape against the backdrop of the [...]
  • FY 2013 budget doubles down on “green” energy fueled by critical minerals

    In his much-anticipated proposed FY 2013 Federal budget blueprint released last week, President Barack Obama reaffirmed his commitment to “renewable” energy. An attractive proposition, but it raises the question of whether we are simply trading one set of foreign dependencies for another. Technologies such as electric cars and wind and solar energy generators are heavily [...]
  • Germany jumps into the race for rare earths

    In line with the country’s recent policy shift towards a more active role in the global race for critical mineral resources, a German mining and commodity group has announced its plans to develop a 38,000 tonnes deposit of REEs in the East German state of Saxony.  A newly formed company called Seltenerden Storkwitz AG, which [...]
  • A new “super strong magnetic material” to replace REE-based magnets?

    Northeastern University scientists caused a stir earlier this week with their announcement that they have designed a “super strong magnetic material that may revolutionize the production of magnets found in computers, mobile phones, electric cars and wind-powered generators,” alluding to the possibility of replacing neodymium/praseodymium permanent magnets. On his website TechMetalResearch.com, American Resources expert Gareth [...]
  • China to cut export quotas for antimony, tungsten and other specialty metals

    Bearing testimony to the fact that China’s geopolitical power play stretches beyond rare earths elements, around which its restrictive export policies were centered in recent months, China has announced it is going to cut export quotas for other specialty metals as well.   According to Nasdaq, Beijing’s China Daily News and the Rare Earths industry journal have [...]
  • China again tightens REE exports; Japan seeks to diversify supply base.

    Worried about China’s ongoing rare earths stranglehold and further cutbacks of exports, Japan looks to diversify its rare earths supply basis. While a delegation of Japanese business leaders recently urged China to ensure a stable supply to Japan, the Japanese government is stepping up its efforts to find alternative sources for the sought-after commodity. In [...]

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