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American Resources Policy Network

Ensuring policies to expand the domestic supply of critical
American minerals for industry and national defense

Jadarite and the Materials Science Revolution – “Kryptonite” to Alleviate Mineral Supply Concerns?

In 2007, a new mineral found in Serbia made headlines around the world. “Kryptonite Discovered in Mine” – wrote the BBC about the discovery of a material the chemical formula of which – sodium lithium boron silicate hydroxide – happened to match the one of the famed kryptonite stolen by Lex Luthor from a museum in the (…) more

  • Critical Minerals Alaska – Rhenium Riches in Alaska Could Help Alleviate Supply Issues

    The BBC has dubbed Rhenium — another metal included in the Department of the Interior’s Final List of 35 Minerals Deemed Critical to U.S. National Security and the Economy — a “super element” with standout properties that can be likened to “alien technology.” Thus, it comes as no surprise that Shane Lasley, writing for North of 60 Mining (…) more

  • Chinese Strategy and the Global Resource Wars – A Look at the Arctic 

    It’s the big elephant in the resource room – China. The recently-released 130-page long declassified version of the Defense Industrial Base Report mention the words “China” or “Chinese”  a “whopping 229 times” – for good reason.  As the Department of Defense argues in the report, “China’s domination of the rare earth element market illustrates the potentially dangerous interaction between Chinese economic (…) more

  • Defense Industrial Base Report “Clear Sign We Need to Act Urgently”

    In a new piece for The Hill’s Congress Daily Blog, retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams argues the recently released Defense Industrial Base Report and its findings, which we previously discussed here and here, represent a call to action for Congress and other stakeholders, because it shows that “[j]ust when we should be retooling for (…) more

  • ARPN’s McGroarty for The Hill: With USMCA, Time to Take Strategic North American Alliance to the Next Level Has Arrived

    “Now that President Trump has won agreement to replace NAFTA with the USMCA — the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement — he has an opportunity to build on that accomplishment, and broaden the benefits of trade to strengthen national security,” writes ARPN Principal Daniel McGroarty in a new op-ed for The Hill. The next step, says McGroarty, (…) more

  • Squaring the Circle – The Circular Economy, Urban Mining and Mineral Resource Policy

    As Maroš Šefčovič, Vice-President of the European Commission for energy policy outlined earlier this month in a video clip, pursuing the vision of a closed-loop circular economy is one of the core tenets of EU resource policy. The concept of a circular economy — a system which thrives on sustainability and focuses mainly on refining (…) more

  • European Union Pushes Ahead With Attempt to Create Battery Manufacturing Value Chain in Europe

    While the United States is finally taking steps to approach mineral resource policy in a comprehensive and strategic fashion, the European Union got a head start several years ago, and has since begun enacting mineral resource policy initiatives within the context of its raw materials strategy.  With its ambitious 2050 low-carbon vision, and the rise (…) more

  • A View From Across the Pond: European Resource Policy Through the Prism of a Low-Carbon Vision

    The recently-released Defense Industrial Base study, which once more has underscored the need for a comprehensive overhaul of U.S. resource policy, directed its focus on U.S. competitiveness primarily vis-à-vis China. Already vast and resource-rich, the country has demonstrated an insatiable appetite for the world’s mineral resources and has pursued an aggressive strategy to gain access (…) more

  • Beyond Golf Clubs and Aircraft – “Critical Minerals Alaska” Zeroes in on Titanium 

    In the latest installment of his “Critical Minerals Alaska” series for North of Sixty Mining News, Shane Lasley zeroes in on Titanium – an “abundant element that has become an important industrial commodity only within the past 150 years,” according to USGS. As Lasley writes, “Titanium conjures images of the durable and lightweight metal used to build aircraft, replacement hips, (…) more

  • New NMA Infographic Visualizes Impact of Overreliance on Foreign Minerals

    The long-awaited Defense Industrial Base report is ringing the alarm on supply chain vulnerabilities for the defense sector. As followers of ARPN will know, some aspects of the issues outlined in the report could be alleviated if the United States had a comprehensive mineral resource strategy and streamlined, updated permitting system for domestic mining projects (…) more

  • ARPN Expert Panel Member: Defense Industrial Base Report “A Significant Step Forward for the U.S. Military”

    With the long-awaited Defense Industrial Base report finally released, analysts have begun pouring over the 146-pages-long document. One of the first issue experts to offer commentary in a national publication was Jeff Green, president of Washington, D.C.-based government relations firm J.A. Green & Company, and member of the ARPN panel of experts. Writing for Defense (…) more

  • Long-Awaited Defense Industrial Base Report Unveils Significant Strategic Vulnerabilities, Holds Major Implications for Resource Policy

    While September coverage for our blog mostly revolved around two major story lines, i.e. electronic vehicles battery tech and trade, today’s release of the long-awaited Defense Industrial Base Report will likely change this for October — for good reasons. As Peter Navarro, assistant to the president for trade and manufacturing policy, outlines today in a (…) more

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METALS & MINERALS 101

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  • Aluminium 13 Al 26.982
     

    Aluminium

    Major Uses: domestic consumption, transportation, building, electrical
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 38%
    Major Importers: Canada, Russia, China, Mexico

     
  • Iron 26 Fe 55.845
     

    Iron

    Major Uses: construction, transportation (predominantly automotive), cans and containers
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 7%
    Major Importers: Canada, European Union, China, Mexico

     
  • Cobalt 27 Co 58.933195
     

    Cobalt

    Major Uses: aircraft gas turbine engines, cemented carbides for cutting, wear-resistant applications
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 81%
    Major Importers: Norway, Russia, China, Canada

     
  • Copper 29 Cu 63.546
     

    Copper

    Major Uses: building construction, electric and electronic products, and transportation equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 30%
    Major Importers: Chile, Canada, Peru, Mexico

     
  • Palladium 46 Pd 106.42
     

    Palladium

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Silver 47 Ag 107.87
     

    Silver

    Major Uses: coins and medals, industrial applications, jewelry and silverware, and photography
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 65%
    Major Importers: Mexico, Canada, Peru, Chile

     
  • Tantalum 73 Ta 180.95
     

    Tantalum

    Major Uses: automotive electronics, pagers, personal computers, and portable telephones
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 100%
    Major Importers: Australia, China, Kazakhstan, Germany

     
  • Rhenium 75 Re 186.207
     

    Rhenium

    Major Uses: petroleum-reforming catalysts, superalloys used in turbine engine components
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 86%
    Major Importers: Chile, Netherlands

     
  • Platinum 78 Pt 195.084
     

    Platinum

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Gold 79 Au 196.966
     

    Gold

    Major Uses: Jewelry and arts, electrical and electronics, dental and other
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 33%
    Major Importers: Canada, Mexico, Peru, Chile

     

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