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American Resources Policy Network

Ensuring policies to expand the domestic supply of critical
American minerals for industry and national defense

Perspective: Life Takes 30 Minerals, Your iPhone Requires 75

It may not be brand new, but this video serves as a good reminder of  why the long overdue mineral resource policy reform debate now underway is so critical. Last Friday, pursuant to December’s Executive Order 13817, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke released his draft list of “35 Minerals Deemed Critical to U.S National (…) more

  • New USGS Mineral Resource Commodity Summaries Report – An Important Reminder to Keep Momentum Going for Policy Overhaul

    Without much fanfare, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) released its annual Mineral Commodity Summaries report at the end of January. Followers of ARPN will know that we usually await the release of said study with somewhat bated breath. However, this year was slightly different, as the context in which to embed this year’s report (…) more

  • ICYMI – Video and Supporting Documents for AGI Webinar on “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials”

    Last month, the American Geosciences Institute ran a webinar entitled “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials.”  Speakers for the event, which discussed “efforts to gather information and develop tools that can be used to ensure a secure national and global supply of mineral resources, and identify and quantifying vulnerabilities in this supply, among others,” (…) more

  • 2018 – A Tipping Point For U.S. Resource Policy and Related Industries?

    The following is a guest post by ARPN expert panel member Chris Berry, Founder, House Mountain Partners. His expertise focuses on, but is not limited to, energy metals including Lithium, Cobalt, Graphite, Vanadium and Rare Earths. The Executive Order recently signed by President Trump to prioritize domestic natural resource development couldn’t have come at a (…) more

  • Materials Science Profiles of Progress: CMI Announces New Partnership to Recover REEs from E-Waste

    A new year, a new installment of our Materials Science Profiles of Progress series: The Critical Materials Institute (CMI), a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub under the auspices of Ames Laboratory has announced a new collaboration entered into by one of its industry associates to recover Rare Earth Elements (REEs) from electronic waste.  Momentum (…) more

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METALS & MINERALS 101

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  • Aluminium 13 Al 26.982
     

    Aluminium

    Major Uses: domestic consumption, transportation, building, electrical
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 38%
    Major Importers: Canada, Russia, China, Mexico

     
  • Iron 26 Fe 55.845
     

    Iron

    Major Uses: construction, transportation (predominantly automotive), cans and containers
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 7%
    Major Importers: Canada, European Union, China, Mexico

     
  • Cobalt 27 Co 58.933195
     

    Cobalt

    Major Uses: aircraft gas turbine engines, cemented carbides for cutting, wear-resistant applications
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 81%
    Major Importers: Norway, Russia, China, Canada

     
  • Copper 29 Cu 63.546
     

    Copper

    Major Uses: building construction, electric and electronic products, and transportation equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 30%
    Major Importers: Chile, Canada, Peru, Mexico

     
  • Palladium 46 Pd 106.42
     

    Palladium

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Silver 47 Ag 107.87
     

    Silver

    Major Uses: coins and medals, industrial applications, jewelry and silverware, and photography
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 65%
    Major Importers: Mexico, Canada, Peru, Chile

     
  • Tantalum 73 Ta 180.95
     

    Tantalum

    Major Uses: automotive electronics, pagers, personal computers, and portable telephones
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 100%
    Major Importers: Australia, China, Kazakhstan, Germany

     
  • Rhenium 75 Re 186.207
     

    Rhenium

    Major Uses: petroleum-reforming catalysts, superalloys used in turbine engine components
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 86%
    Major Importers: Chile, Netherlands

     
  • Platinum 78 Pt 195.084
     

    Platinum

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Gold 79 Au 196.966
     

    Gold

    Major Uses: Jewelry and arts, electrical and electronics, dental and other
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 33%
    Major Importers: Canada, Mexico, Peru, Chile

     

LATEST TWEET

@ARPNetwork: Perspective: Life takes 30 minerals, your iPhone requires 75 https://t.co/khpnD0ZpXl #criticalminerals, #mining,… https://t.co/wwi6wckJBO

4 hours ago