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American Resources Policy Network

Ensuring policies to expand the domestic supply of critical
American minerals for industry and national defense

Stakeholders and Experts Weigh in on DOI’s Finalized Critical Minerals List 

Last week, the Department of the Interior released its finalized Critical Mineral list. In spite of calls to include various additional metals and minerals (see ARPN principal Daniel McGroarty’s public comments on the issue here) DOI decided to stick with its pool of 35 minerals deemed critical from a national security perspective. “With the list (…) more

  • ARPN’s Daniel McGroarty Comments on DOI’s Release of Final Critical Minerals List

    The Department of the Interior released its final list of Critical Minerals today. The following is ARPN principal Daniel McGroarty’s statement on the list: “DOI issued its final list of Critical Minerals, unchanged at 35.  What we see is the degree of US dependency – the US is 100% import-dependent for 14 of the 35 (…) more

  • USGS Scholars Provide Insights into Resource Interdependency and Conflict Potential in New Study

    The advances in materials science have been fundamentally transforming the way we look at metals and minerals – both from a usage, as well as a supply and demand perspective.  With that, the nature of potential resource conflict has also changed. As USGS National Minerals Information Center scholars Andrew L. Gulleya, Nedal T. Nassar,  and (…) more

  • Coalition of Congressional Members and Stakeholders Call on EPA to Reverse Pre-emptive Veto and Restore Due Process to U.S. Mine Permitting  

    Earlier this month, the Congressional Western Caucus led a coalition of Members of Congress and Stakeholders to call on EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to reverse a pre-emptive veto of the Pebble Mine project in Alaska. The veto stopped the project before it had formally applied to begin the permitting process — a unilateral expansion of (…) more

  • Copper Gap Looms as Demand for EV Tech Continues to Surge

    While just a few short years ago, Rare Earth Element coverage dominated non-fuel mineral resource news cycles, it is the metals and minerals that fuel electric vehicle and battery technology that are making headlines these days. Here, the spotlight has been on Cobalt, Lithium, and, to a lesser extent, Nickel and associated supply and demand (…) more

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METALS & MINERALS 101

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  • Aluminium 13 Al 26.982
     

    Aluminium

    Major Uses: domestic consumption, transportation, building, electrical
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 38%
    Major Importers: Canada, Russia, China, Mexico

     
  • Iron 26 Fe 55.845
     

    Iron

    Major Uses: construction, transportation (predominantly automotive), cans and containers
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 7%
    Major Importers: Canada, European Union, China, Mexico

     
  • Cobalt 27 Co 58.933195
     

    Cobalt

    Major Uses: aircraft gas turbine engines, cemented carbides for cutting, wear-resistant applications
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 81%
    Major Importers: Norway, Russia, China, Canada

     
  • Copper 29 Cu 63.546
     

    Copper

    Major Uses: building construction, electric and electronic products, and transportation equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 30%
    Major Importers: Chile, Canada, Peru, Mexico

     
  • Palladium 46 Pd 106.42
     

    Palladium

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Silver 47 Ag 107.87
     

    Silver

    Major Uses: coins and medals, industrial applications, jewelry and silverware, and photography
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 65%
    Major Importers: Mexico, Canada, Peru, Chile

     
  • Tantalum 73 Ta 180.95
     

    Tantalum

    Major Uses: automotive electronics, pagers, personal computers, and portable telephones
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 100%
    Major Importers: Australia, China, Kazakhstan, Germany

     
  • Rhenium 75 Re 186.207
     

    Rhenium

    Major Uses: petroleum-reforming catalysts, superalloys used in turbine engine components
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 86%
    Major Importers: Chile, Netherlands

     
  • Platinum 78 Pt 195.084
     

    Platinum

    Major Uses: catalysts to decrease harmful emissions in light- and heavy-duty vehicles, also used in chemical and petroleum refining sector, and fabrication of laboratory equipment
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 94%
    Major Importers: South Africa, Germany, United Kingdom, Canada

     
  • Gold 79 Au 196.966
     

    Gold

    Major Uses: Jewelry and arts, electrical and electronics, dental and other
    Import Dependency for U.S.: 33%
    Major Importers: Canada, Mexico, Peru, Chile

     

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@ARPNetwork: Stakeholders and experts weigh in on DOI’s finalized #criticalminerals list: https://t.co/4LmuzzrSQA #mining

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