-->
American Resources Policy Network
Promoting the development of American mineral resources.
  • Perspective: Life Takes 30 Minerals, Your iPhone Requires 75

    It may not be brand new, but this video serves as a good reminder of  why the long overdue mineral resource policy reform debate now underway is so critical.

    Last Friday, pursuant to December’s Executive Order 13817, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke released his draft list of “35 Minerals Deemed Critical to U.S National Security and the Economy,”  kicking off a month-long comment period.

    While we value the list as a critical first step in the right direction, we have to note that of the five Gateway Metals only two – Aluminum and Tin – appear on the draft list, even though the other three (Copper Zinc and Nickel) are Gateways to more than a half-dozen minerals that do make the list.

    As we’ve previously pointed out, harnessing the interrelationship between Gateway Metals and their Co-Products, many of which are increasingly becoming the building blocks of 21st Century technology, should be a focal point of any to-be-formulated critical mineral resource strategy.

    We are encouraged by the fact that, while stopping short of including Copper, Nickel and Zinc, the draft list specifically acknowledges the co-dependency between Gateway Metals and their Co-Products.

    Citing Copper as a key example, witnesses during a Congressional Hearing on Congressman Mark Amodei’s H.R. 520, the National Strategic and Critical Minerals Production Act, also stressed the important interrelationship between Gateway Metals and the tech metals they “unlock.” 

    Here’s hoping that this important theme will be expanded upon in the coming weeks – and ultimately find its way into our nation’s comprehensive federal action plan to encourage domestic resource production, through mining, recycling and reclamation.

  • New USGS Mineral Resource Commodity Summaries Report – An Important Reminder to Keep Momentum Going for Policy Overhaul

    Without much fanfare, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) released its annual Mineral Commodity Summaries report at the end of January. Followers of ARPN will know that we usually await the release of said study with somewhat bated breath. However, this year was slightly different, as the context in which to embed this year’s report has changed.

    According to the report, the total value U.S. non-fuel mineral resource production increased by six percent over 2016 in 2017 and now stands at an estimated $75.3 billion.

    On the resource dependency front, the findings of the report do not differ much from last year’s.  The number of non-fuel minerals for which the United States is 100% import dependent went from 20 to 21, but that increase is due to the inclusion of a new material, Nepheline Syenite, into the scope of the USGS survey.  And just like in 2016, the U.S. was more than 50% import-dependent for 50 metals.

    What has changed over last year, however, is the overall policy environment.

    With the issuing of last December’s executive order to promote domestic mineral resource production, which also calls on the Secretary of the Interior to devise a comprehensive mineral resource strategy, we have taken an important step towards alleviating our long-standing – and in many cases unnecessary over-reliance on foreign sources of supply.

    For good reason. Resource dependency figures may not have increased since last year, but from a historical perspective – as USGS pointed out in its landmark Professional Paper 1802 released in December of last year –  the number of 100 percent import-reliant minerals has increased from just 11 commodities in 1984.

    So while this year’s Mineral Commodity Summaries may not hold too many news – but the report serves as a critical reminder of how important it is to keep the momentum generated at the end of the last year going. Stakeholders must ensure that we get the development of a “comprehensive federal action plan to encourage domestic resource production, through mining, recycling and reclamation” right.

    If we do, we will be better off as a nation – both in terms of national security and economic well-being.

  • ICYMI – Video and Supporting Documents for AGI Webinar on “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials”

    Last month, the American Geosciences Institute ran a webinar entitled “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials.”  Speakers for the event, which discussed “efforts to gather information and develop tools that can be used to ensure a secure national and global supply of mineral resources, and identify and quantifying vulnerabilities in this supply, among others,” (…) more

  • 2018 – A Tipping Point For U.S. Resource Policy and Related Industries?

    The following is a guest post by ARPN expert panel member Chris Berry, Founder, House Mountain Partners. His expertise focuses on, but is not limited to, energy metals including Lithium, Cobalt, Graphite, Vanadium and Rare Earths. The Executive Order recently signed by President Trump to prioritize domestic natural resource development couldn’t have come at a (…) more

  • Materials Science Profiles of Progress: CMI Announces New Partnership to Recover REEs from E-Waste

    A new year, a new installment of our Materials Science Profiles of Progress series: The Critical Materials Institute (CMI), a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub under the auspices of Ames Laboratory has announced a new collaboration entered into by one of its industry associates to recover Rare Earth Elements (REEs) from electronic waste.  Momentum (…) more

  • Event Alert: Resources for Future Generations (#RFG2018) Conference

    We have barely taken down the Christmas decorations, but stores have their Valentine’s Day merchandise out, and we’re already halfway through January.  It may feel that way, but it’s really not to early to highlight an event coming up in June – Summer will be here before we know it. So mark your calendars, ladies (…) more

  • Lithium – A Material “Coming of Age” is Case in Point for Mineral Resource Policy Reform

    As we have outlined, last month’s executive order on critical minerals could have far-reaching implications for our national security and economic wellbeing.  If you needed a case in point – look no further than Lithium. One of the hottest commodities of the day, Lithium, as ARPN expert panel member and managing director of Benchmark Mineral (…) more

  • AGI to Host Webinar on Critical Minerals

    Mark your calendars – the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) will host a timely webinar on critical mineral issues later this month. The webinar entitled “Tracking the Global Supply of Critical Materials” will be held on Friday, January 26, 2018, at 11:00am EST, and will “focus on U.S. and European Union (EU) efforts to gather information (…) more

  • Member of ARPN Expert Panel Outlines Implications of Executive Order Targeting Critical Minerals

    Amidst the latest political drama, bomb cyclones and button size comparisons which are dominating the news cycle, you may have missed two great pieces of analysis by member of the ARPN panel of experts Jeff Green, president and founder of Washington, DC-based J.A. Green & Company – so we are highlighting them for you: In (…) more

  • New Year’s Resolutions for Mineral Resource Policy Reform

    If you’re one of nearly half of all Americans, you will have already made a few New Year’s resolutions for 2018.   Among the most popular are personal betterment goals like “losing weight,” and “exercising more.”  While we’re all for making personal resolutions, at ARPN, we’re more concerned with the goals our policy makers are (…) more

Archives